Publication details.

Paper

Year:2014
Author(s):J. Hernández-Urcera, M. Garci, Á. Roura, Á. González, M. Cabanellas-Reboredo, B. Morales-Nin, Á. Guerra
Title:Cannibalistic behavior of octopus (octopus vulgaris) in the wild
Journal:JOURNAL OF COMPARATIVE PSYCHOLOGY
ISSN:0735-7036
JCR Impact Factor:2.344
Volume:128
Issue No.:4
Pages:427-430
D.O.I.:10.1037/a0036883
Web:https://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0036883
Abstract:© 2014 American Psychological Association.The first description of cannibalism in wild adult Octopus vulgaris is presented from 3 observations made in the Ría de Vigo (NW Spain), which were filmed by scuba divers. These records document common traits in cannibalistic behavior: (a) it was intercohort cannibalism; (b) attacks were made by both males and females; (c) in 2 of the records, the prey were transported to the den, which was covered with stones of different sizes; (d) the predator started to eat the tip of the arms of its prey; (e) predation on conspecifics occurred even if there were other abundant prey available (i.e., mussels); and (f) the prey/predator weight ratio in the 3 cases ranged from 20% to 25% body weight. The relationships between this behavior and sex, defense of territory, energy balance, food shortage, competition and predation, as well as how the attacker kills its victim are discussed.

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